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Rich Quinnell

TI Unveils Cloud Support Ecosystem for Embedded Developers

Rich Quinnell
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Rich Quinnell
Rich Quinnell
4/16/2014 1:59:48 PM
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Re: Embedded development
Yes, I remember those days of limited support and proprietary tools that were not well executed. Hopefully we are not going tor repeat them as connectivity becomes an essential element of MCU-based design.

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Sheetal
Sheetal
4/16/2014 7:10:48 AM
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Worldwide Wizard
Re: Embedded development
With smomething like TI cloud system it will be of so much help to the design engineer. Remember the times when we had to talk to microprcessor guys so many times to get support for particular section. Hope after the design is over and successfully tested, people will start sharing code and hardware best practices in these cloud systems so that when new teams work on them anywhere in the globe they dont have to reinvent the issues.

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Rich Quinnell
Rich Quinnell
4/14/2014 5:35:39 PM
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Re: Embedded development
Gil, thanks for your additional insights.  I didn't mean to imply that traditional embedded design was going away, but I was wondering where all the new IoT designs were going to come from.

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Gil
Gil
4/14/2014 4:52:12 PM
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Re: 15+ cloud providers
Rick,

One clarification regarding the mentioned number of 15 cloud service providers –

This number is just a ballpark, and it refers to companies providing IOT specific services, not generic cloud services. These include cloud applications development tools for communication with embedded device, along with cloud APIs and embedded libraries that enable the embedded-to-cloud communication.

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Gil
Gil
4/14/2014 4:39:34 PM
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Re: Embedded development
Rich,

I would say that an IOT design is very much like any other embedded design with added components and SW for Internet communication. For the development of networking SW components we are seeing subject matter experts, which don't necessarily have to be EEs.

Nevertheless, the traditional EE design of embedded products is not going away, at least not due to the introduction of Internet capabilities. Additionally, TI is helping EEs that are not networking experts to create IOT designs by hiding a lot of the networking SW complexity inside the IC and delivering ready to use networking libraries, APIs and example code.

The TI IOT cloud ecosystem is helping designers further by providing a starting point for an end-to-end solution that include embedded SW and cloud SW pre-integrated.

Finally, reference designs do not remove all the design work – they just make it easier and faster.

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Rich Quinnell
Rich Quinnell
4/14/2014 12:27:42 PM
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Re: 15+ cloud providers
Rick, I think TI concentrated on providers that had proven their ability to work with TI products rather than general providers like Amazon. Seeking sales synergy, I expect.

I saw your coverage in EETimes and had intended to list it here in a comment, but you beat me to it.

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Rich Quinnell
Rich Quinnell
4/14/2014 12:23:46 PM
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Re: Embedded development
Thanks for the clarification Gil.

Here's a question for you: With all these reference designs, consulting, and other services available, do you see IoT design as expanding beyond the traditional embedded developer to include developers who are subject matter experts but not EEs? I wonder how much IoT device design is becoming a commodity where the application software is the value. Rather like personal computer motherboards became a commodity.

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Rich Quinnell
Rich Quinnell
4/14/2014 12:02:06 PM
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Re: Embedded development
crisgh, with complete reference designs being available, one wonders how many IoT designs will reach the market with all the work having been done in software, using the reference design as the hardware platform. Perhaps the role of the EE in the IoT is going to be diluted.

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rick.merritt@ubm.com
rick.merritt@ubm.com
4/14/2014 10:33:18 AM
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15+ cloud providers
The interesting thing to me in this was that TI says there are now at least 15 IoT cloud servcie providers. I don't know if that includes general cloud providers like Amazon EC2.

A year ago at an EE Live panel, folks were bewailing that no one was handling this, now its what Loring Wirbel used to call an "instant commodity."

FYI I covered the TI news at http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1321863

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Gil
Gil
4/12/2014 4:47:05 PM
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Re: Embedded development
TI is looking at how and when to expand the IoT cloud ecosystem to include companies beyond cloud services. However, we also have an extensive network of wireless connectivity development third parties to help speed customers' development. The network consists of recommended companies, RF consultants and independent design houses that provide hardware modules and design services.

For more details - http://www.ti.com/devnet/docs/catalog/searchcatalog.tsp

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