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Rich Quinnell

Tale of 2 Thermostats: An IoT Device Teardown

Rich Quinnell
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Rich Quinnell
Rich Quinnell
11/29/2013 7:41:31 PM
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Re: automated doors
Actually, the main reason that sliding doors are used rather than swinging doors is that the swinging doors represent a greater hazard. They might swing out and surprise then knock someone over when triggered from the other side. With sliding doors there is no problem.

What the IoT brings to the party is the ability to have the doors open only if you are authorized to enter, using an RFID tag from your smartphone or something. Facial recognition could also be used, but that's probably too expensive an option for commercial applications.

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michaelsumastre
michaelsumastre
11/25/2013 2:35:54 PM
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Worldwide Wizard
Re: automated doors
Most public places already have some sort of automated doors, most of which using proximity sensors that trigger once peopl are within a specific radius. Curiously, it is often used for sliding doors and not for typical swinging designs partly due to addtional hydraulics involved i guess. What I would find more interesting woud be sensing one's car arriving and then thermostats making the right adjustments while door opening after proper facial recognition have been made.

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Rich Quinnell
Rich Quinnell
11/21/2013 1:04:31 PM
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automated doors
You may be right about those doors, one day. For now, it appears that there are systems being implemented that at least unlock the door for you as you approach because it recognizes you - either by face or because you carry an RF token. Opening the door will take a motor, and it may be awhile yet before motorized doors become common in homes.

But opening the curtains and turning on the light as well as unlocking the door, those are all functions available now.

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SunitaT
SunitaT
11/21/2013 12:24:11 AM
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Worldwide Wizard
Re : Tale of 2 Thermostats: An IoT Device Teardown
Home automation took yet another turn. IoT is standardized now. And yes, IoT manufacturers will include the time of use in each IoT in the price of the IoT.  Next is happening and we might get an interconnected system in our own homes, and a thermometer that will detect the room temperature, and if it goes under comfort levels, it will signal the climate control system in the house to start heating the place up. The day is not far away when our homes will open the doors if scanners on the hinges detect us.

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Rich Quinnell
Rich Quinnell
11/11/2013 4:04:06 PM
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Re: next Step for developers
Thanks for pointing out WiFi Direct. I was not familiar with this technology, even though it has been around for a few years now. Guess it hasn't really taken off yet. Still, it does have promise. Here's a link to more technical info on WiFi Direct.

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Vishal Prajapati
Vishal Prajapati
11/11/2013 1:08:19 AM
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Local Activator
Re: Talking to the utility
Thanks for the pointers Rich. It is nice to know such a standards are being implemented. If available widely, it would definitely be integrated in the home automation systems which will be able to predict the utility bills in advance and will be able to suggest cost effective usage of the perticular home equipment.

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mahendra_agarwal
mahendra_agarwal
11/9/2013 9:28:17 AM
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Regional Resource
Re: next Step for developers
Rich, overalll article/discussion helping me to understand where different home automation/improvement companies are able to achive so far, their offering to customers to take compartive decisions

At least for  smart thermostat, for communication purpose basically  as of now configuration is based on traditional wifi. but i think going in  future for such equipments Wifi-Direct would also play role 



 

  http://readwrite.com/2013/09/10/what-is-wi-fi-direct#awesm=~omHpnMBQiKV0DY

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mahendra_agarwal
mahendra_agarwal
11/9/2013 7:30:56 AM
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Re: next Step for developers
>>I wonder how these products could talk if these products use different OS.

Isn;t this can be resloved with the use OS wrapper for diiferent applications, but I think main obstracle could be working of different applications with different communication protocols, Single underlying technology will not be able to satisify all type of applications.

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Rich Quinnell
Rich Quinnell
11/7/2013 8:28:04 PM
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Re: Talking to the utility
I believe there are efforts underway to create a standard for smart meters to talk with home automation products and smart appliances. ZigBee is one of them, as this article notes: http://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/california-expands-the-smart-meter-to-home-area-network-market

Here's an organization involved in setting such standards: Smart Grid Interoperability Panel.

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Rich Quinnell
Rich Quinnell
11/7/2013 8:23:10 PM
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Re: next Step for developers
mahendra, that next step may already be occurring in the smart home. I have seen systems appearing in Lowes and other places that offer a gateway with mulitple and integrated equipment and services for home automation. Not just the one-off offerings these devices represent.

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